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Nature

Bon Iver share new song Second Nature [Video]

The soundtrack’s previous single “Just Look Up,” a collaboration from Ariana Grande and Kid Cudi contained an ironic wink to the movie’s satire of our collective inaction to the consequences of climate change. In contrast, “Second Nature” taps Bon Iver’s trademark anthemic folk experiments for a sincere – if lyrically oblique – plea for us to take stock of our ways.

Nicholas Britell’s full Don’t Look Up soundtrack is out today. Stream it in full below. Just Look Up is out on December 24 on Netflix and stars Leonardo DiCaprio, Jennifer Lawrence, Meryl Streep, Jonah Hill, Timothée Chalamet, and more.

Next year, Bon Iver will head out on tour with Dijon. Find those dates here.

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Categories
Nature

Myocarditis in the UK: Moderna vs. the Virus! NEW Nature Medicine Paper [Video]

Here is the paper: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41591-021-01630-0Vinay Prasad, MD MPH; Physician & Associate Professor Google Scholar: https://scholar.google.com/citations?user=ym4rwk0AAAAJ&hl=enSubstack: https://vinayprasadmdmph.substack.com/Podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/plenary-session/id1429998903Personal Website: www.vinayakkprasad.com Laboratory Website: www.vkprasadlab.comPodcast Website: www.plenarysessionpodcast.comAcademic Publications: http://www.vinayakkprasad.com/papersFollow me on:Twitter @vprasadmdmph

Categories
Nature

South Pacific garbage patch | Spectroom [Video]

The South Pacific garbage patch is an area of elevated levels of marine debris and plastic particle pollution, most of which is concentrated within the ocean's pelagic zone. It is located within the South Pacific Gyre, which itself spans from waters east of Australia to the South American continent, as far north as the Equator, and south until reaching the Antarctic Circumpolar Current. The degradation of plastics in the ocean also leads to a rise in the level of toxins in the area. This garbage patch is the most recently discovered having only been confirmed in mid-2017. The South Pacific garbage patch has been compared in nature to the Great Pacific garbage patch's state in 2007, making the former ten years younger. The garbage patch is impossible to detect using satellites, or other visual means as most particles are smaller than a grain of rice.