Categories
Uncategorized

Twitter updating misinformation labels | fox61.com [Video]

Twitter is overhauling the labels to make them more useful and easier to notice. Testing starts Thursday on US users.

Editors Note: The video in the player above is from a story that aired in April 2020.

Last May, as Twitter was testing warning labels for false and misleading tweets, it tried out the word “disputed" with a small focus group. It didn't go over well.

“People were like, well, who’s disputing it?" said Anita Butler, a San Francisco-based design director at Twitter who has been working on the labels since December 2019. The word “disputed," it turns out, had the opposite effect of what Twitter intended, which was to "increase clarity and transparency," she said.

The labels are an update from those Twitter used for election misinformation before and after the 2020 presidential contest. Those labels drew criticism for not doing enough to keep people from spreading obvious falsehoods. Now, Twitter is overhauling them in an attempt to make them more useful and easier to notice, among other things. Beginning Thursday, the company will start testing the redesigns with some U.S. users on the desktop version of its app.

Experts say such labels — used by Facebook as well — can be helpful to users. But they can also allow social media platforms to sidestep the more difficult work of content moderation — that is, deciding whether or not to remove posts, photos and videos that spread conspiracies and falsehoods.

“It's the best of both worlds" for the companies, said Lisa Fazio, a Vanderbilt University psychology professor who studies how false claims spread online. “It's seen as doing something about misinformation without making content decisions."

While there is some evidence that labels can be effective, she added, social media companies don't make public enough data for outside researchers to study how well they work. Twitter only labels three types of misinformation: “manipulated media,” such as videos and audio that have been deceptively altered in ways that could cause real-world harm; election and voting-related misinformation and false or misleading tweets related to COVID-19.

One thing that's clear, though, is that they need to be noticeable in a way that prevents eyes from glossing over them in a phone scroll. It's a problem similar to the one faced by designers of cigarette warning labels. Twitter's election labels, for instance, were blue, which is also the platform's regular color scheme. So they tended to blend in.

The proposed designs added orange and red so they stand out more. While this can help, Twitter says its tests also showed that if a label is too eye-catching, it leads to more people to retweet and reply to the original tweet. Not what you want with misinformation.

Then there's the wording. When “disputed" didn't go over well, Twitter went with “stay informed." In the current test, tweets that get this label will get an orange icon and people will still be able to reply or retweet them. Such a label might go on a tweet containing an untruth that could be, but isn't necessarily immediately harmful.

More serious misinformation — for instance, a tweet claiming that vaccines cause autism — would likely get a stronger label, with the word “misleading" and a red exclamation point. It won't be possible to reply to, like or retweet these messages.

“One of the things we learned was that words that build trust were important and also words that that were not judgmental, non-confrontational, friendly," Butler said.

This makes sense from Twitter's perspective, Fazio said. After all, “a lot of people don't like to see the platforms have a heavy hand," she added.

As a result, she said, it's hard to tell if Twitter's main goal is to avoid making people angry and alienating them from Twitter instead of simply helping them understand “what is and isn’t misinformation.”

Watch/Read More
Categories
Uncategorized

Started streaming on June 4, 2018 Welcome to Virtual Railfan, please read this important info. You are watching a live stream of Norwalk, Connecticut, USA, for people who enjoy watching trains. The cams are located on the SONO Switch Tower museum, check them out here: http://www.westctnrhs.org/towerinfo.htm Internet is hosted by the Slice of Italy restaurant, right next door to the Tower! A must visit when you're in town: http://sliceitalysono.com/FAQ courtesy of local William McMorris: https://bit.ly/2T9JEdEMNRR /tracker arrivals: https://mymnr.org/stationArrivals/131You are welcome to join our family friendly chat, but keep in mind that there’s a community with rules already established. Please check them out below. East Cam: https://youtu.be/kWLx08A18fcWest Cam: https://youtu.be/2JRCi3-bhP0Recording, duplication, or distribution of our videos is strictly prohibited without permission. CHAT RULES: • Be polite and respectful • Please use English, we need a single language to be able to understand each other. If you’re not fluent, use a translator such as Google Translate: https://translate.google.com • Don’t post in ALL CAPS or use excessive emojis, letters or characters. • Don’t discuss politics, religion, race, sex, violence, disturbing details about train or vehicle accidents, or anything like that. We try to be mindful of any children who may be watching. • Don't use the terms "foamer" or "foaming" in your comments or your username. Many railfans find them derogatory and offensive. • The conversation here is trains, and please remember that it needs to come first. • Please keep personal details out of the chat. Remember, you are sharing information with hundreds of people, not just those directly involved in the chat. • Don’t ask to become a moderator. It’s earned. If we’re interested in your assistance, we will contact you. • Please don’t use our chats to seek attention, stand on your soapbox, or criticize other people’s presences or contributions • Just be nice, it’s amazing what happens when we’re all nice to each other. THINGS THAT WILL GET YOU BANNED: • Inappropriate usernames or avatar • Profanity • Coming into chat for the sole purpose of asking for subscriptions (subs) or to blatantly promote your channel • Being intentionally disruptive, creating arguments or any other jerk-like behavior • Not following the moderators’ instructions • Blocking a moderator (including Nightbot)ABOUT THIS FEED: Norwalk, CT, is located on the Northeast Corridor (NEC), between Washington, D.C., and Boston, via Baltimore, Wilmington, Philadelphia, Trenton, Newark, New York City, New Haven, and Providence. This is the New York City-Boston section, formerly the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad (New Haven, NH, or NYNH&H for short). Specifically, this is the junction at South Norwalk, where the Danbury Line (to the eponymous Danbury, CT), diverges/splits off of the NEC, and this is at milepost 41.3; to the west (left) at milepost 41.0 is the station at South Norwalk. Numerous passenger trains can be seen every day, of both the Metro-North Commuter Railroad (M-N, MNCR, or MNCW for short) and of Amtrak (AMTK), including the "Acela Express", numerous "Northeast Regionals", and the "Vermonter". Metro-North is part of New York's Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA). Besides passenger trains continuing towards or coming from Boston, locals coming to/from the Danbury Line can also be seen. This portion of the NEC, from New York City to New Haven, is owned by Metro-North; east of New Haven to Boston, it is owned by Amtrak. Originally, electrification ended at New Haven, but it was extended to Boston in the late 1990's in preparation for the inauguration of the "Acela Express" service. Norwalk, being between New York City and New Haven, is on the older 12.5 kilovolts (kV) at 60 Hertz (Hz); from New Haven to Boston the newer electrification is 25 kV at 60 Hz. There are no radio feeds/streams or ATCS layouts/servers available. When’s the next train? Yeah, we get this a lot. You can figure out the next Amtrak passenger train with this handy link: https://bit.ly/2GvDqNS There’s no schedule for freight trains, but some of our more knowledgeable members will provide real-time information when it’s available. Please refrain from asking. ABOUT VIRTUAL RAILFAN: Website: http://virtualrailfan.com Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/virtualrailfan/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/virtual_railfan Links to the Free VRF YouTube Cams.: https://bit.ly/3qWGohlLinks for Virtual Railfan Members - Full Cam List: https://bit.ly/2LU6VN6Know a good location for a camera? We’d love to hear about it., If you have any contacts in the area, please let us know. Please email us at : locations@virtualrailfan.com